The Indigenous Man Who Declared His Own Country

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Livia Albeck-Ripka / Sept. 13, 2019 / NYTimes, The Saturday Profile

QUOTE:

To [Murrumu of Walubara} and his followers, the Great Barrier Reef is a part of the Yidinji Territory, a self-declared nation

“…at every other opportunity, Mr. Walubara pokes at assumptions of Australian sovereignty and land ownership in the region where he lives: “It’s just a truth that’s unfamiliar to you,” he tells people who don’t follow his line of thinking.

“He’s one of the great elders of this land,” said Isaac Cassady, 19, who lives in Cairns and identifies as being of Yidinji descent.

“It’s not about guilt tripping people or blaming people,” he added of Mr. Walubara’s mission. “It’s about working together to recognize, respect and move on.”

For Mr. Walubara, the road ahead may be lonely and fraught, but he remains convinced that a treaty will occur in his lifetime. Looking at other struggles around the world, he said he had come to appreciate that there was no shortcut to healing the wounds of history.

“The peaceful way is the best way,” he said, “even if it is the longest.”

UNQUOTE

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Disclaimer The views and opinions relayed in this blog are those of the original authors and other contributors. These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of Global Agility Services LLC or its staff.

The American Economy Is Creating a National Identity Crisis

It has become painfully clear that we are more than just consumers and corporate shareholders.

It has become painfully clear that we are more than just consumers and corporate shareholders.


Tim Wu / August 26, 2019/ NYTimes

QUOTE:

Since the 1980s, American economic policy has insisted on the central importance of two things: cheaper prices for consumers and maximum returns for corporate shareholders.

But these priorities also generate an internal conflict, for they neglect, repress and even enslave our other selves: our identities as employees, producers, family members, citizens. And in recent years — as jobs become increasingly unpleasant and unstable, as smaller towns and regional economies are gutted, as essential industries like the pharmaceutical and telecommunications sectors engage in outlandish profiteering, and above all, as economic inequality becomes the trademark of our nation — the conflict seems to have reached a breaking point.

...

the specific prioritization of consumers and shareholders in economic policy dates from the 1970s and ’80s, in what amounted to a mostly well-intentioned project gone too far.

By now it has become obvious that the formula has gone too far, contributing to much of the social and economic dissatisfaction in the country — from the perpetual low-level fatigue with our consumer culture to the growing rage against callous corporations. In the service of ourselves as consumers and shareholders, we have hollowed out many of the aspects of life that we care most about.

For an individual person, the lengthy neglect of significant parts of one’s identity can lead to psychological harm. The same goes for a whole nation.

Life without a simple formula is, of course, harder and more confusing. But there is no coming to consciousness without difficulty and pain, and what the United States desperately needs is a vision of economic health more consistent with what we know makes life worth living.

UNQUOTE

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Disclaimer The views and opinions relayed in this blog are those of the original authors and other contributors. These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of Global Agility Services LLC or its staff.

Parlez-Vous Anglais? Yes, of Course.

Europeans speaking perfect English sounds like good news for native speakers, but it may also be a threat.

Europeans speaking perfect English sounds like good news for native speakers, but it may also be a threat.


Disclaimer The views and opinions relayed in this blog are those of the original authors and other contributors. These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of Global Agility Services LLC or its staff.

Pamela Druckerman / Aug. 10, 2019 / NYTimes

QUOTE:

The EF English Proficiency Index, whose online test rates adults around the world, has found … Of the 27 countries it ranks as highly or very highly proficient, 22 are in Europe.

It won’t be long before Americans realize that top European schools offer a fast-growing number of bachelor’s and master’s degrees, taught entirely in English, for a fraction of the price of many American schools, even if you add on overseas airfare. (In 2009, there were about 55 English B.A.’s offered in Continental Europe; by 2017, there were 2,900.)

Natives are losing their competitive edge. A few jobs still require perfect English, but in the corporate world good English has become a basic requirement, not a personal selling point. … Crucially, the ubiquity of English lulls us Anglophones into thinking that it’s O.K. to be monolingual. It’s not. I’ve been at Amsterdam dinners where everyone is speaking brilliant English, but the minute I leave the table they switch back to Dutch. If all we know is English, we won’t know what the rest of the world is saying about us.

UNQUOTE

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The end of the white-collar world as we know it is nigh!

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What industrial Globalization did during the last 30 years to blue-collar workers and for the era’s winners: Executives, investors, and stockholders…

…the "5G digital revolution" is going to do to & for white-collar workers during the next 15 years. 

Driving time to work will be irrelevant, you will meet your colleagues from around the world in your company’s 24/7 Holographic Meeting Room.  Often, they will be able to work for less.  All indications are that staying at the table will mean staying in the middle class.

We can’t help you with the Hard &/or Creative Skills you will need.  We can help you with the agility you need to work well on a global team. 

The dawn of the 5G world. How 5G technology will ultimately alter the DNA of the digital experience / December 14, 2018 / Read the Washington Post article with content by Content from AT&T Business

Will 5G remake the world, or just make it a little faster? The promise and pitfalls of wireless’s next generation / Read the Deloitte report


Disclaimer The views and opinions relayed in this blog are those of the original authors and other contributors.

Working abroad could boost your salary by more than 1/3

“…18 to 34-year-old respondents said they believed they were promoted move quickly after moving abroad.”

“…18 to 34-year-old respondents said they believed they were promoted move quickly after moving abroad.”


Karen Gilchrist / July 3, 2019 / CNBC Make It

QUOTE:

HSBC’s Expat’s survey released Thursday…feedback from 18,000 expats living in 163 markets.

…millennials and Gen Z employees enjoyed the greatest step up in terms of earnings and career progression of all overseas workers…

The average 18 to 34-year-old’s earnings rose 35% after relocating overseas…

…(31%) of 18 to 34-year-old respondents said they believed they were promoted move quickly after moving abroad. Additionally, 71% said they had picked up new skills and 55% said they felt more confident.

Three locations — Hong Kong, the United Arab Emirates, and the U.K. — particularly stood out in this year’s report

UNQUOTE

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Disclaimer The views and opinions relayed in this blog are those of the original authors and other contributors. These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of Global Agility Services LLC or its staff.

The Surprising History of Nationalist Internationalism

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David Motadel, a historian at the London School of Economics and Political Science / July 3, 2019 / Opinion section, NYTimes

QUOTE:

The far right is less parochial than we think…

….
Internationalism, a concept that, after all, implicitly presumes the existence of the nation, and extreme nationalism are not necessarily incompatible.

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[RP: Before our Global Agility training, we clearly define the difference between Globalization, the International System, Globalism, and Global Agility.

  •  Globalization: economic and technological facts, genies we cannot put back in the bottle.

  • The International System: Formal agreements between nations – regulating, among other things, international trade -- largely based on the Bretton Woods Agreement of 1944.

  • Globalism and Anti-Globalism: Opinion about the previous two.

Global Agility refers to what we as individuals can do about the risks and opportunities present in our personal globalized/globalizing environment.

The ongoing Globalization of our economy creates demand for what Human Resource professionals call “Global Agility”.  As individuals the only thing we can do about the International System is to be members of a public that understands enough about the issues to give our representatives some leeway as they try to fix problems and update the system.  While we enjoy opinions as much as anyone else, we are not in the business of promoting or resisting Globalization.  We are in the business of helping anyone – no matter what opinions they express – to better pursue their economic self-interest and promote their beliefs and values.  Our motto is that you have to fit well in the world as it is to effectively pursue your success and represent your values. 

We doubt that a world of globally agile people will agree on much. We are sure that a world of globally inept people will fight about their disagreements.]

 

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Disclaimer The views and opinions relayed in this blog are those of the original authors and other contributors. These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of Global Agility Services LLC or its staff.

Deciding how to decide #goodglobalization

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Scott Hass / June 17, 2019 / Letter to Editor, NYTImes

QUOTE:

The best decisions are often made with three strategies I experienced in Japan: Consider the effect on others of the decision; consider if the best decision is not to decide at that moment; and have deep awareness of the sources of the thoughts and emotions informing the decision.

UNQUOTE

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The writer, a clinical psychologist, is the author of the forthcoming book, “Why Be Happy? The Japanese Way of Acceptance.”


Disclaimer The views and opinions relayed in this blog are those of the original authors and other contributors. These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of Global Agility Services LLC or its staff.

The new definition of a Kilogram represents a victory of humankind over chaos in the universe. Really.

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Brian Resnick / May 20, 2019 / VOX

QUOTE:

For more than a century, the kilogram had a very simple definition: It was the mass of a hunk of platinum-iridium alloy that’s been housed at the International Bureau of Weights and Measures in Sèvres, France since 1889.

And for those thinking the kilogram doesn’t matter in the US, which uses imperial units like pounds, feet, and gallons, our measurements are derived from (metric) units. Officially, in the US, 1 pound is defined as 0.45359237 kilograms.

The problem is that Big K is a man-made object, and therefore, it is imperfect. If Big K changes, everything else has to adjust. And this has happened. Big K is not constant. It has lost around 50 micrograms (about the mass of an eyelash) since it was created. But, frustratingly, when Big K loses mass, it’s still exactly one kilogram, per the old definition.

That’s no good. So, what’s better?

The new definition anchors the value of the kilogram to a constant in nature, which can never, ever change

Starting Monday, the kilogram will be defined by the Planck constant.

UNQUOTE

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Disclaimer The views and opinions relayed in this blog are those of the original authors and other contributors. These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of Global Agility Services LLC or its staff.

Ghana's 2020 digital census [RP: IT to help female migrants from rural regions]

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Youyou Zhou in Accra Ghana / June 18, 2019 / Quartz Africa

QUOTE:

…2020 will be the first time Ghana uses electronic questionnaires to survey the population, a practice only a few African nations have succeeded in doing, and a lot more are trying to adopt going forward.

….

For a country like Ghana, where data on its residents are incomplete and infrequently updated, the census provides a rare opportunity to collect comprehensive data on desegregated population and map all housing structures in the country. Aided by digital technologies, the census results can be useful to allocate resources and formalize much more of the country’s economy.

But census isn’t only about updating population figures. The categories and questions designed into the questionnaire will help collect quality data on human and household conditions across the country. The Ghanaian government wants to pack as many questions as possible in one questionnaire because the kind of desegregated data the census collects isn’t available elsewhere in Ghana.

Ghana’s government wants to find out as much as possible about its citizens right down to how they manage their waste… That can help us determine how disease can spread and what has to be done to improve sanitation within the country…

The scale of data the census collects is crucial to the government’s effort to formalize larger parts of Ghana’s economy, where over 80% of the employed non-farming population work in informal sectors… Jobs such as street vendors, taxi drivers or head porters, most of whom are female migrant workers from rural regions working in urban areas,  aren’t registered with the government. 

The country has tried to roll out a national identification system multiple times in the past without success. There isn’t a uniform address system, either: Many in rural areas do not have a numbered address and rely on a nearby landmark such as a tree, or a gate, to indicate where they live. The current administration wants to solve both problems: The government is pushing residents to register biometric national ID cards (Ghana cards) that assign Ghanians unique ID numbers, as well as building a formal addressing system to document all housing structures in the country since 2017.

“To fight inequality, we must count everyone, and make everyone accountable to pay their fair share in taxes” – Ghana VP Bawumia

A complete database of its people and buildings could help inform policy decisions on taxation and social welfare for the government: a step toward a more formalized economy.

THE OBSTACLES

In 2010, the government had to postpone the census from March to September because of a funding gap. This year, a digital census imposes new challenges: GSS currently doesn’t have the right gadgets, and the money isn’t in place yet to procure 60,000 of them.

The tablets currently being used for the trial census have to be charged every hour or so. Some new tablets Ghana hopes to acquire will be solar charged to be used in areas without electricity. They also need to be water resistant as heavy rains are expected in Ghana close to the end of March.

One source of the gadgets may come from countries that have conducted their censuses digitally. GSS is working with United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), a development partner for the census, targeting especially two African countries, Malawi and Kenya. Malawi conducted its first digital census last year with the support from UNFPA: among the 20,000 tablets they used, 15,000 were from the UK, while the other 5,000 were bought by the government.

UNQUOTE

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Disclaimer The views and opinions relayed in this blog are those of the original authors and other contributors. These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of Global Agility Services LLC or its staff.

Parting thoughts from a French diplomat as he leaves America.

Does the U.S. want to become a new “Middle Kingdom” or does it want to continue helping to shape the world?

Does the U.S. want to become a new “Middle Kingdom” or does it want to continue helping to shape the world?


François Delattre,France’s ambassador to the United Nations/ June 13, 2019 / Opinion, NYTimes

[RP: “The Middle Kingdom...was the domain of King Augustus Bonifacius. King Bonifacius was not a good ruler of the land. He was greedy, uncaring of his heirlooms, and kept a retinue of worthless knights. Eventually his misrule led to Farmer Giles' decision to establish himself as an independent lord and eventually the king of the new Little Kingdom. ...Augustus Bonifacius was unable to prevent the separation of Giles' realm from the Middle Kingdom.”

“Farmer Giles of Ham” is a short story written by J.R.R. Tolkien in 1947]

QUOTE:

We are now in a new world disorder. The three main safety mechanisms are no longer functioning: no more American power willing to be the last-resort enforcer of international order; no solid system of international governance; and, most troubling, no real concert of nations able to re-establish common ground.

In the absence of a functioning multilateral system, the world tends to devolve into spheres of influence; that leads of confrontation, as European history has shown too many times. The risk is even greater when geopolitical divides are superimposed on the technological battle between American- and Chinese-led digital worlds.

Europe faces an existential decision. Does it want to remain a full-fledged player in the world, with a vision and policy it owns? Or will it resign itself to becoming, at best, an impotent witness to the rivalry among the great global powers or, at worst, these powers’ playground?

The United States also faces a fundamental choice. Does it want to become a new “Middle Kingdom,” an insular Fortress America? Or does it want to continue speaking to the world and helping to shape it?

 A prerequisite for a stable international environment is for America to be engaged in world affairs and multilateral institutions. To combat terrorism, prevent nuclear proliferation, manage international crises and protect our children from an environmental tragedy in the making, we need America’s strong commitment, as well as new forms of multilateralism adapted to the times we live in. America can’t make it alone, and the world can’t make it without America.

UNQUOTE

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Disclaimer The views and opinions relayed in this blog are those of the original authors and other contributors. These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of Global Agility Services LLC or its staff.