A cultural map of the world. Watch them morph from 1981 to 2015!

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The World Values Survey is a global network of social scientists studying changing values and their impact on social and political life

[RP:

Note: Lower places on the map have more Traditional values; higher have “Secular-Rational” values.

The USA is more traditional than all Protestant and Catholic Europe and only 3 English-speaking countries are more traditional.

If you are knowledgeable regarding the Roman Catholic Church globally you won’t be surprised by how traditional African and Latin societies are compared to Catholic Europe and the USA.

Note: The Survival-oriented values of places to the left are, let’s say, indicative of the base of Maslow's hierarchy of needs; the Self-Expressive values on the right have to be affordable.

Again, the USA is more survival-oriented than much of the Self-Expressive “1st World”.

It’s fascinating to watch this over and over again, focusing on a group or a country. (Apparently, Thailand is at the center of the values universe.) Enjoy.

WATCH OUR VALUES MORPH…


Disclaimer The views and opinions relayed in this blog are those of the original authors and other contributors. These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of Global Agility Services LLC or its staff.

Many Americans Will Need Long-Term Care. Few Can Afford It.

A decade from now, most middle-income seniors will not be able to pay the rising costs of independent or assisted living.

A decade from now, most middle-income seniors will not be able to pay the rising costs of independent or assisted living.


Paula Span / May 10, 2019 / NYTimes

QUOTE:

[By 2029] About 14.4 million people will fall into the middle-income category, almost double the current number. 

A decade hence, 80 percent of middle-income seniors will have less than $60,000 a year in income and assets, not including equity in their homes. Yet the estimated cost of assisted living plus out-of-pocket medical expenses will hit $62,000, by the team’s conservative estimate.

UNQUOTE

READ THE ARTICLE…


Disclaimer The views and opinions relayed in this blog are those of the original authors and other contributors. These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of Global Agility Services LLC or its staff.

Europe’s Crisis of Integration

Two strands wind through the mesh of problems the Continent faces: the downsides of globalism, and lessons taken from the past.

Two strands wind through the mesh of problems the Continent faces: the downsides of globalism, and lessons taken from the past.


By Ian Kershaw, a British historian with a focus on Germany. / April 29, 2019 / NYTimes

QUOTE:

If there is a common thread in all of these problems, it is the interplay of national interests and identities with the demands of an increasingly integrated continent, and an increasingly global world.

If a sense of European identity has remained largely an idea and aspiration rather than a reality, it has nonetheless acquired a form of political content. “Europe,” in the eyes of most Europeans, has come to be largely synonymous (positively or negatively) with the European Union. “Europe” demarcates the countries of the bloc as an interwoven community of nations separate from the others on the European continent — mainly Russia and former members of the Soviet Union. This “Europe” is neither the “Europe of the fatherlands” favored by de Gaulle and others, nor the supranational entity that was associated with Jacques Delors. Rather, it stands as a unique entity somewhere in between. Some continue to look to an ever-widening ”Europe” incorporated in a federal European state as a utopian future. Others, increasing in number, regard “Europe” with distance, even hostility, as a foreign body impinging upon their sovereignty as nation-states.

This has left the “Europe” of the European Union in the eyes of many of its citizens as little more than an opaque and detached organization embodying rules and regulations that affect most people’s lives, but cannot be challenged through political engagement. That opens the door to the politics of nationalist and separatist movements. In reality, the main emotional allegiance is not to “Europe” but still to citizens’nation-state or region (or would-be independent nation-state).

However, while the union has been unable to create a genuine sense of European identity, the dangerously aggressive, chauvinistic nationalism that spawned two world wars scarcely exists any longer, and what does has been diluted and countered by the gradual increase in transnational cooperation and interdependence.

Europe has fought for and won freedom. It has acquired prosperity that is the envy of most of the world.

So, perhaps the elusive search for a European identity is unnecessary, as long as citizens of Europe’s individual nation-states are committed to upholding the common European principles of peace, freedom, pluralist democracy and the rule of law; to sustaining the material well-being that underpins that commitment; and to striving to strengthen wherever possible the bonds of transnational cooperation and friendship.

UNQUOTE

[RP:

It’s a thing about the globalized perspective that you can see more clearly in other countries what you are blind to in your own. When you consider another country you stand a better chance of not having your identification and your partisan loyalty stand in the way of fairly considering the facts and the essential situation. So read this article about Globalization’s impact on the self-governance of Europe to lay bare your logic, beliefs, values, et cetera…  Then, return to consider the USA. 

For instance, the article also includes the side comment on the USA:

Quote:

Today, the legacy of the past — overwhelmingly still the memories of the war, occupation and the Holocaust — plays a crucial role in shaping national identities in ways that have no equivalent in the United States.

Unquote

Do you really think that our memories of the European settlement era, Slavery, the Civil War, Urbanization, and the pendulum swing of Equality/Inequality don’t have an equally powerfully threatening impact on shaping our national identity? ]

READ THE ARTICLE…


Disclaimer The views and opinions relayed in this blog are those of the original authors and other contributors. These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of Global Agility Services LLC or its staff.

Americans Are Among the Most Stressed People in the World, Poll Finds

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Niraj Chokshi / April 25, 2019 / NYTimes

QUOTE:

WE WORSE:

In the United States, about 55 percent of adults said they had experienced stress during “a lot of the day” prior, compared with just 35 percent globally. Statistically, that put the country on par with Greece, which had led the rankings on stress since 2012.

About 45 percent of the Americans surveyed said they had felt “a lot” of worry the day before, compared with a global average of 39 percent.

 

WE ON PAR:

Meanwhile, the share of Americans who reported feeling “a lot” of anger the day before being interviewed was the same as the global average: 22 percent.

 

WE BETTER:

The findings were not all bleak for the United States. Despite having widespread negative experiences, Americans also generally reported more positive experiences, on average, than the rest of the world did.

Globally, just 49 percent of those interviewed said they had learned or had done something interesting the day before. In the United States, however, 64 percent of adults said the same.

 

 

BUT, THE WORLD’S IN A FUNK

Worldwide, negative experiences were just as widespread last year as in 2017, which was the darkest year for humanity in more than a decade, according to Gallup. While stress declined globally, anger increased. Worry and sadness reached new heights, and feelings of physical pain were unchanged.

UNQUOTE

READ THE ARTICLE…


Disclaimer The views and opinions relayed in this blog are those of the original authors and other contributors. These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of Global Agility Services LLC or its staff.

Beyond Economics: Fears of Cultural Displacement Pushed the White Working Class to Trump

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Daniel Cox, Rachel Lienesch, Robert P. Jones, PhD / May 9, 2017 / PRRI

QUOTE:

Nearly half (48%) of white working-class Americans say, “things have changed so much that I often feel like a stranger in my own country.”

UNQUOTE

READ THE STUDY…


Disclaimer The views and opinions relayed in this blog are those of the original authors and other contributors. These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of Global Agility Services LLC or its staff.

Finding the Beauty in Cultural Appropriation

What traveling the world taught me about the universality of playing dress-up in other peoples’ styles.

What traveling the world taught me about the universality of playing dress-up in other peoples’ styles.


Connie Wang / April 20, 2019 / NYTimes

QUOTE:

In other words, cultural appropriation might cause outrage, but it will not stop. And so the question is why? What do people get out of adopting aesthetics from other cultures? Through my travels, I’ve come to see appropriation as a form of communication: Sometimes what people are trying to say is trivial, hurtful and condescending — a bindi to proclaim that they’re “exotic” for instance, or cornrows to say they’re “cool.” But other times, what is being said is difficult and important.

Last October, I interviewed a Japanese rapper named Mona who’s a self-described “chola,” a member of an urban Mexican-American subculture. Part of it was that she liked the look: bold makeup, hoop earrings.

But Mona’s experimentation coincided with her rebellion against how Japanese society shamed her for her outspokenness. In movies like “Selena” and “Mi Vida Loca,” she saw kindred spirits: women celebrated, not ostracized, for their aggression. Some of what Mona did made me cringe: She used gang symbols without the accompanying realities of gang life; she wore rosaries though she is not religious. And yet cholo culture gave her a way to act, speak and dress — all to communicate that she does not agree with how her own culture insists Japanese women should be.

UNQUOTE

READ THE ARTICLE…


Disclaimer The views and opinions relayed in this blog are those of the original authors and other contributors. These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of Global Agility Services LLC or its staff.

The Case for a Global Constitution

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Apr 18, 2019 / KAUSHIK BASU, former Chief Economist of the World Bank, is Professor of Economics at Cornell University and Nonresident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution / https://www.project-syndicate.org The World’s Opinion Page

QUOTE:

Imagine two societies. In one, the dominant religion requires everyone to drive on the left; in the other, everyone must drive on the right. Were they forever to exist on separate islands, there would be peace. But with globalization and the movement of people between the two islands, the seeds of conflict will have been sown.

Societies can either perpetuate such conflict through war and domination, or they can agree to a common code. …

Compromise is rarely easy, especially where interest and identity overlap. But given the extent to which globalization has already progressed, we cannot simply stay in our lane and hope for the best.

UNQUOTE

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Disclaimer The views and opinions relayed in this blog are those of the original authors and other contributors. These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of Global Agility Services LLC or its staff.

Is the U.S. a Democracy? A Social Studies Battle Turns on the Nation’s Values

Michigan spent five years debating how to teach American history. One of the biggest questions was how to describe the nation’s government.

Michigan spent five years debating how to teach American history. One of the biggest questions was how to describe the nation’s government.


Dana Goldstein / April 7, 2019 / NYTimes

QUOTE:

The United States, unlike many other developed nations, lacks a national curriculum that defines what students should know. Each of the 50 states can create its own learning standards.

These documents are closely examined. While schools can teach material not included in them, they shape the content in standardized tests, and many educators rely heavily on the standards as they craft lesson plans. Student teachers are trained to use them.

Activists have long seen influencing state standards as an effective way to shape the next generation of voters.  

UNQUOTE

READ THE ARTICLE…


Disclaimer The views and opinions relayed in this blog are those of the original authors and other contributors. These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of Global Agility Services LLC or its staff.

Globalization, cultural DISTANCE, AND cultural CONVERGENCE: some new evidence

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Danko Tarabar / March 16, 2019 / IDEAS

QUOTE:

The basic question is an intuitive one -- does globalization make countries culturally more proximate or distant? -- and it is not a new one in sociology, anthropology, political science, or economics. In this paper, I make use of some novel data to examine this old question.

…I found that higher economic dimension of globalization (cross-border movements of capital and goods) correlates with increased cultural distances between countries, while social globalization (cross-border movements of people, information, and ideas) correlates with decreased distance. The jury is still out as to theoretical mechanisms at play that explain these patterns in the data. One idea is that economic globalization stimulates further specialization of countries in their prevailing sectors, which entrenches existing cultural typologies. Alternatively, social globalization (movement of people across borders) weakens that entrenchment and leads to cross-fertilization of social norms. 

UNQUOTE

RP:

Cutting-edge research sheds light on a contradiction in our lives we commented on March 23: In a world with no "language barriers", enough border walls to circle the Earth.

In short, Globalization is like an egg-beater.  Economically it tends to separate the human-race; socially it brings them together.  It herds people into National Economies; it makes the entire world accessible. People already identify with their Country but, in a globalized world, this is no longer true of their Corporations.  People tend to include group members and exclude Others but, in a globalized world, you may now have more in common with Strangers than with people “on your own side”.

You can’t make an omelet without breaking eggs.

Hence, Economic-Nationalism coexists with American-origin transnational companies paying few taxes here.  The income of Blue-collar and now White-collar employees is depressed by competition from other countries, from people you can Skype with after reading this sentence.

Here are two assumptions you can no longer take for granted:

1)      Little to nothing important exists in the space between countries.

2)      Economic competition between countries solves your livelihood problems.

DOWNLOAD ARTICLE…

From IDEAS is the largest bibliographic database dedicated to Economics and available freely on the Internet.  Offered by RePEc (Research Papers in Economics) is a collaborative effort of hundreds of volunteers in 999 countries to enhance the dissemination of research in Economics and related sciences. 


Disclaimer The views and opinions relayed in this blog are those of the original authors and other contributors. These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of Global Agility Services LLC or its staff.

Fed’s Daly says globalization is a key reason why inflation is so low

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By Greg Robb, Senior Economics Reporter / March 26, 2019 / MarketWatch

QUOTE

With the unemployment rate so low, why is inflation so muted? Globalization, at least in part, is the answer, said San Francisco Fed President Mary Daly on Tuesday.

Daly said that both workers and businesses are finding it hard to set prices in the new global marketplace.

...workers have suffered from a loss of bargaining power...

“Declining unionization — along with increased automation and globalization — have made it harder for workers to push for higher pay, even in very healthy job markets"

...many firms have lost pricing power amid global competition...

“This means they have a harder time passing along rising costs, such as wages, to final goods prices."

UNQUOTE

READ THE ARTICLE…


Disclaimer The views and opinions relayed in this blog are those of the original authors and other contributors. These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of Global Agility Services LLC or its staff.